The One Minute Negotiator: Simple Steps to Reach Better Agreements

There are tons of negotiation books, and that’s just on my shelves. However, there is always room for another, especially if it is an easy read with some practical suggestions, and that is just what “The One Minute Negotiator: Simple Steps to Reach Better Agreements” by Don Hutson and George Lucas provides. It has a Foreword by Ken Blanchard, author of “The One Minute Manager,” and like that classic text, this book is written as a parable with the negotiation lessons coming out as the main character of the story learns them. It’s not earth shattering, especially to someone who teaches mediation and negotiation skills. But it is a good, simple book, that will help those who suffer from what the authors call negotiaphobia.

The story is about Jay Baxter, who works for XL Information Solutions, and who embarks on a company cruise. It just so happens, that a speaker on the cruise will be presenting a seminar called “Treating Your Negotiaphobia.” Jay is reluctant to attend, and even puts his foot in his mouth while talking to the negotiation instructor the night before the seminar, as he does not know who he is talking to. (Yes, it is predictable, and you the reader know right away the mistake he is making.)

Jay decides to be committed to the course and see what he can learn. To his surprise, the concepts the instructor teaches make sense and he embraces the information and enjoys the seminar. Obviously, he uses the newly learned strategies and concepts after leaving the cruise to succeed in his position.

So, yes, it is a simple story and predictable. But you are not really reading it to be entertained and kept in suspense. The key to the book is the formula the instructor teaches during his on board seminar. It is a simple process that entails recognizing you are in a negotiation and reviewing the viable strategies, evaluating your tendency to use each of the negotiation strategies, as well as the tendencies of the other side(s), and selecting the proper strategy for the particular negotiation.

The authors do a good job of explaining the concepts and why they are important. At the end of each chapter there is a summary of the chapter’s insights. At the beginning of this review, I commented on how many negotiation books are out there. Many of them teach specific negotiation strategies and tactics. This book is different in that it teaches a framework to look at negotiations and I would encourage people to look at the techniques and tactics learned elsewhere through this framework.

One thing about the book is that it is very easy to read. It’s not long at all, and if it provides a framework for you to look at negotiations differently, especially if you suffer from negotiaphobia, it will be worth your time. We negotiate all of the time, and any time you can learn to increase your effectiveness in this valuable skill, it will pay off. This was a good addition to my conflict and negotiation resources, and I’m sure I’ll review it now and then as I continue to teach others, learn, and negotiate myself.

Does a Center for Sleep Disorders Present a More Sound Diagnosis?

Trouble sleeping can be very frustrating because of how it makes a person feel. While there is a lot of help available for these issues, many people ignore the problem and do nothing about it. Since a sleep disorder is not considered a big problem, checking into a center for sleep disorders doesn’t even cross the sufferers mind. Instead a person suffering from sleep problems goes to the store and relies on a sleeping aid. For small sleeping issues a sleeping aid can be all that is needed. However, it can result in very negative results when a serious sleeping condition is present. The reason why disorders are so misunderstood and overlooked is because the effects cannot be visually seen or repaired. A center for sleep disorders deals with these unseen dangers regularly and knows what to look for. They can be more helpful than a regular doctor when it comes to diagnosis and treatment.

The Negative Affects of Sleep Apnea

The symptoms of sleep apnea are not very obvious and a person with this particular disorder can go a long time without ever knowing they have a problem. Daytime tiredness and irritability are often the only symptoms seen and can be attributed to many other sources. Snoring and other symptoms that occur while asleep are not as easily identified unless another party observes them. Apnea is not a condition that will go away on its own. It can weaken your immune system and make you more vulnerable to illnesses and harmful diseases. Increased fatigue will put you at risk for driving and job related accidents. Your home life can be affected. Serious health problem such as high blood pressure and heart complications are likely. Over time, nightly sleep loss resulting from this condition can lead to mental health issues. The problems are abundant and can all be prevented if apnea is detected. Sleep apnea symptoms can be reduced with the right treatment.

What You Can Expect At a Sleep Apnea Clinic

A sleep apnea clinic or center offers testing and treatment plans for individuals who may have apnea. Sleep studies are performed to determine what is causing the condition. Medicine can be prescribed for certain sleep problems. Apnea often requires surgery, a mouth device, or a machine for treatment. A questionnaire is given during the first visit and is used to get a general idea of the problem. You will be evaluated by a well qualified team that consists of physicians, psychologists, and surgeons. A pediatrician may be included on the team for children being diagnosed. Patients are given an initial interview along with psychological testing. If a diagnosis cannot be made from this information, you will have to stay overnight or for a few days for further testing. A sleep apnea clinic will record sleep patterns and occurrences to obtain a more precise diagnosis. Treatment are presented by a specialist and then started as soon as possible for the most efficient results. Participating in testing can result in a much faster diagnosis and the best treatment.

Effective Presentations – Assessing the Audience

In every instance, the audience itself will have an impact on your presentation. Consider the way you communicate with your friends, your children (or nieces/nephews), and your parents. Whether you mean to or not, you probably select different approaches when communicating with each group. While you may approach your parents with deference to their age and experience, you’d probably expect a young child to have less knowledge of the world and to respect your own wisdom. Thus, when presenting an argument to these groups, you’re likely to differentiate your argument based on audience characteristics.

The same rules should apply to all presentations. Although you could chose to present the exact same message to all audiences, your presentation will be more meaningful to your listeners if you tailor your message to the attributes of the particular group with whom you’re communicating. Remember ­ the success of your presentation lies in your ability to reach your audience. Even the most flawless speaker can fail to inspire listeners if the message isn’t perceived as significant to their lives or their experience. Think back to sitting in your high school classroom wondering “when will I ever use this again?” Do not expect that simply because you work for the same company as your audience members your presentation will seem relevant and consequential to your listeners.

To help target your presentation to your audience, consider the following characteristics:

1) Size

Will you present to a large group? A small group? A single person? Large group presentations often call for more formality and more structure, while highly structured presentations to small group may seem rigid and out of place. If presenting to a large group, you’ll need to do more to make all audience members feel involved in your presentation. With a small group, it may be easier to encourage participation.

2) Demographics

Demographic factors to consider include age, occupation, ethnic or cultural background, socio-economic status, educational background and gender. Presenting to a group of older politicians will require more deference to age and experience than presenting to a group of recent graduates. When speaking to a group of doctors, you can assume a certain level of medical knowledge. When speaking about college admissions to a lower socio-economic status audience you might want to include information about financial aid, grants, and scholarships. In contrast, audiences with members of a higher socio-economic status who don’t qualify for aid will perceive such information as useless.

3) Knowledge Level:

What does your audience already know about your topic? Are you presenting to a group of water engineers on the topic of water safety? Or are you presenting to the city council on the topic of water safety? With some audiences, you may need to provide more background/historical
information about your topic before you can effectively persuade them of the correctness of your position.

4) Motivation

Why is your audience listening to your presentation? Are you a consultant giving feedback to a group who has paid a lot of money for your opinion? Or did you call a meeting to voice your own opinion? If the audience is not inherently motivated to listen to you, then you’ll need to give them reason to listen within the presentation itself.